Advertisement

LIVE STREAMS

MESSAGE

LIVE STREAMS

MESSAGE

Advertisement

LIVE STREAMS

MESSAGE

Advertisement

Confusion growing over the timing of the emergency calls made to assist Australian cricketer Phillip Hughes

by | Nov 27, 2014

Australian cricketer Phillip Hughes

Australian cricketer Phillip Hughes hits the ground after being hit

There’s been growing confusion over the timing of the emergency calls made in the moments after Australian cricketer Phillip Hughes was tragically struck by a bouncer ball at the Sydney Cricket Ground.

Hughes died at hospital earlier today.

Paramedics took 15 minutes to reach the fallen cricketer at the Sydney Cricket Ground on Tuesday as he lay critically injured on the field, and it took two calls to triple-0 to get them there.

NSW Ambulance Commissioner Ray Creen was being hauled before the Health Minister Jillian Greene today to discuss the incident after the service put out two conflicting statements yesterday about how long it took for an ambulance to get to the SCG.

The first triple-0 call was made at 2.29pm, six minutes after Hughes was struck in the head by a ball from Sean Abbott during a Sheffield Shield match and fell face-first into the pitch.

When an ambulance failed to arrive, a second call was made eight minutes later, at 2.37pm.

Ambulance NSW then sent a crew to the SCG from nearby Princes of Wales Hospital at Randwick. They arrived seven minutes later, at 2.44pm, making it 15 minutes between the first call to triple-0 and an ambulance arriving.

phil-hughes-ground_3119577k

Ambulance NSW sent to assist cricketer Phillip Hughes

The ambulance sent out in response to the first phone call arrived second, at 2.52pm – 23 minutes after the first triple-0 call was made.

Across the state, ambulances take on average 7.65 minutes to respond to a call of the highest priority, when the patient’s life is potentially under threat.

After the call was made to triple-0, NSW wicketkeeper Peter Nevill left the ground to stand on Driver Avenue and wait for the ambulance, so he could direct it onto the field.

 

0 Comments