Advertisement

LIVE STREAMS

MESSAGE

LIVE STREAMS

MESSAGE

Advertisement

LIVE STREAMS

MESSAGE

Advertisement

Goal-line technology comes into play in World Cup finals

by | Jun 18, 2014

goal line technology

Goal-line technology

The German company that created the hi-tech cameras which ruled on a World Cup goal for the first time on Sunday is happily anticipating involvement in a growing number of football controversies, but not in its German home market.

GoalControl, which aims 14 cameras at the two goals in each World Cup match and produces 500 computer generated 3-D images in a split second, was called into action for the first time in France’s 3-0 Group E win over Honduras.

In the match, Karim Benzema’s shot cannoned off a post and then hit Honduras goalkeeper Noel Valladares and went over the line.

The computer gave two judgements which were flashed onto the stadium screen. The ball was not over the line when it rebounded off the post, it said. Some fans thought that was the end of the matter.

Then it said that there was a goal after the ball hit Valladares.

FIFA said Monday they will modify the way decisions are communicated to fans. Delia Fischer, a spokeswoman for football’s governing body, said the “unique” nature of the incident — the ball striking a post and rebounding into the Honduran goalkeeper — had caused the confusion.

The system, under which referees receive a vibration and an optical signal on their watches in less than one second, was put in place for the Confederations Cup in Brazil last year. But there was no controversy to test.

Goal-line technology was first used in the 2012 FIFA Club World Cup when the camera-based system Hawk-Eye and the chip in the ball GoalRef system were tested. But again there was no contentious goal to rule on.

 

 

0 Comments