On December 1st, the world observed World AIDS day. Worldwide, approximately 1.7 million people were newly infected with HIV last year. That includes 37,832 people in the U.S and associated territories. In East and Southern Africa, where 7 percent of the population aged 15 to 49 are HIVpositive, there were 800,000 new infections in 2018.

The sensitization efforts worldwide, to treat with less stigmatization to persons infected with HIV/AIDS, continues. Fact remains, you cannot contract HIV/AIDS by speaking with someone, hugging someone, or breathing the same air as someone who has the disease. HIV is spread only in certain body fluids from a person who has HIV. These fluids are blood, semen, pre-seminal fluids, rectal fluids, vaginal fluids, and breast milk.

HERE ARE SOME QUICK FACTS:

  • AIDS-related deaths have been reduced by more than 56% since the peak in 2004.
    • In 2018, around 770 000 [570 000–1.1 million] people died from AIDS-related illnesses worldwide, compared to 1.7 million [1.3 million–2.4 million] in 2004 and 1.2 million [860 000–1.6 million] in 2010.
  • AIDS-related mortality has declined by 33% since 2010.
  • 24.5 million [21.6 million–25.5 million] people were accessing antiretroviral therapy (end ofJune 2019).
  • 37.9 million [32.7 million–44.0 million] people globally were living with HIV (end 2018).
  • 1.7 million [1.4 million–2.3 million] people became newly infected with HIV (end 2018).
  • 770 000 [570 000–1.1 million] people died from AIDS-related illnesses (end 2018).
  • 74.9 million [58.3 million–98.1 million] people have become infected with HIV since the start of the epidemic (end 2018).
  • 32.0 million [23.6 million–43.8 million] people have died from AIDS-related illnesses since the start of the epidemic (end 2018).
  • New HIV infections have been reduced by 40% since the peak in 1997.In 2018, around 1.7 million [1.4 million–2.3 million] were newly infected with HIV, compared to 2.9 million [2.3 million–3.8 million] in 1997.
  • Since 2010, new HIV infections have declined by an estimated 16%, from 2.1 million [1.6 million–2.7 million] to 1.7 million [1.4 million–2.3 million] in 2018.Since 2010, new HIV infections among children have declined by 41%, from 280 000 [190 000–430 000] in 2010 to 160 000 [110 000–260 000] in 2018.