“There is the possibility that at the end of May 2020, we have to look out for a drought.

Meteorologist Arlene Aaron-Morrison

Such is the prediction of this country’s meteorologists as yesterday’s start of the dry season heard Meteorologist Arlene Aaron-Morrison highlight that there is the possibility that at the end of May, T&T could feel the effects of a drought. “ There is a possibility of less dry spells in the earlier part of the season. Temperatures would be warmer than usual,” she said.

WHAT IS A DROUGHT?

drought or drouth is an event of prolonged shortages in the water supply, whether atmospheric (below-average precipitation), surface water or ground water. A drought can last for months or years, or may be declared after as few as 15 days.

HOW YOU CAN CONSERVE WATER…

1. Turn off faucets. Start saving by breaking a bad habit: Never let faucet water run needlessly as you wash or rinse dishes, wash your hands or face, brush your teeth or shave. Bathroom faucets run at about 2 gallons of water a minute. Turn off the tap while you brush your teeth and shave, and you can save hundreds of gallons a month.

Tip: Be sure to fix leaks. A slow drip from a leaking faucet can waste as much as 20 gallons of water a day. A leaky toilet can waste 200 gallons a day.

2. Use every drop. Learn to repurpose water. One easy way is to capture under your colander the potable water you use to rinse fruits and veggies, and deposit it in the garden. Do the same while you wait for your hot water to come in.

3. Double-dip dishes. Take a page from the past and make smart use of dual sinks. Instead of letting the water run while you wash dishes, fill one sink with hot, soapy water for washing, and the other with cool, clear water for rinsing. You’ll use half the water you otherwise would, according to the EPA. If your sink is a single model, use two large bowls for washing and rinsing.

4. Go with low-flow. The bathroom is the site of the greatest indoor water use in the house. So it’s also a place where you can reap major water savings with some smart choices.

Toilets, for example, account for nearly 30 percent of an average home’s indoor water consumption. Older toilets use as much as 6 gallons per flush.

Showering accounts for almost 17 percent of household indoor water use — 40 gallons a day for the average family of four. To save water here, replace a regular showerhead, which uses 2½ gallons a minute, with a WaterSense-certified showerhead, which uses 2 gallons a minute or less while offering the same or better shower performance.

5. Shorten your showers. Use a kitchen timer to time your showers. Aim for five minutes or less.

6. Capture rainwater. There will likely be those random showers during the dry season. Find ways to save and store that rainwater for use in the garden. Using a 55-gallon drum like this one, which catches roof water from gutters and downspouts, is one easy way. Remember to cover your barrels to keep mosquitoes at bay.