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Muslims celebrate Eid Ul Fitr

by | Jul 29, 2014

eidThe Muslim community is celebrating a special day today known as Eid-ul-Fitr.

Eid-ul-Fitr, often abbreviated simply as ‘Eid’, is one of the most widely celebrated festivals in the Islamic calendar and it occurs after the sighting of the new crescent moon which signals the end of the month of Ramadan. Eid is an Arabic term meaning “festivity” or “celebration” while Fitr means “to break the fast”.

As in other parts of the world, Eid ul-fitr in Trinidad and Tobago is marked with great sadness and jubilation.

Sadness that the blessed month of Ramadan has ended, and great happiness that the fast has been completed and Inshallah (God willing) the fast would have been accepted.

Muslims celebrate not only the end of fasting, but also thank God for the help and strength that they believe he gave them throughout the previous month to help them practice self-control.

Eid celebrations are marked by fervent preparations within Muslim communities.

Families decorate their homes, Eid cards and gifts are bought to distribute to friends and family, sweets and other delicacies are prepared, and new clothing is bought or made to celebrate the occasion.

Before the social celebrations begin however, the day begins with prayer.

The Eid prayer is recited in congregation in mosques or in an outdoor area (a ground or park) to accommodate the large numbers who attend this prayer.

New clothes are bought to be worn to mosque for Eid prayer and Mehindi or henna is applied to the hands of the sisters.

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